Common blood pressure drugs may slow dementia decline


Common blood pressure drugs may slow dementia decline

A class of drug used to lower blood pressure could potentially slow the rate of cognitive decline in dementia and even boost brain power, according to a study published by BMJ Open.

Researchers from Ireland analyzed the cognitive decline and brain power of 361 patients with an average age of 77. All had been diagnosed with either Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or a mixture of both.

Of these patients, 85 were already using the blood pressure-lowering (antihypertensive) drugs known as ACE inhibitors (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors). This is a commonly used class of antihypertensive drug. Thirty of the patients who were newly prescribed ACE inhibitors during the first six months of treatment were also analyzed for their brain power activity.

Between the years 1999 and 2010, the researchers used the Standardized Mini Mental State Examination (SMMSE) or the Quick Mild Cognitive Impairment (Qmci) to test the cognitive decline of each patient. This was done on two separate occasions, six months apart.

The patients who were taking ACE inhibitors had slower rates of cognitive decline in the study compared with patients who were not taking the drugs.

The study also revealed that in patients who had been newly prescribed the ACE inhibitors over the six-month period, their brain power improved in comparison with both those already taking them and those not taking them at all.

However, the study authors add that this could be due to the newly prescribed patients having better control over their medication regimen, or due to better blood pressure control or improved blood flow to the brain.

The researchers say:

This [study] supports the growing body of evidence for the use of ACE inhibitors and other [blood pressure-lowering] agents in the management of dementia.

Although the differences were small and of uncertain clinical significance, if sustained over years, the compounding effects may well have significant clinical benefits."

The researchers warn, however, that previous research has indicated that ACE inhibitors may be harmful in some cases, so if future benefit of the drugs in dementia is proven, it may be limited to certain groups of patient.

The study authors call for further research and a controlled trial to confirm their findings. They say:

"If these data can be reproduced in a randomized trial of sufficient length, incorporating appropriate outcome measures, such as an amyloid positron emission tomography (PET), then these agents are likely to have significant benefits in delaying or even preventing dementia."

Higher Blood Pressure May Lead to Brain Shrinkage (Video Medical And Professional 2020).

Section Issues On Medicine: Disease